The Graduate Program

Our Ph.D program concentrates on language and literature, and we therefore stress mastery of the two ancient languages. After proficiency in the languages is established, we expect students to pursue independent scholarly research projects in seminars and in theses and dissertations. Our offerings include a cycle of courses on View of the Lawn in fall, from the Colonnade Club.the major ancient authors and genres, Greek and Latin composition, and advanced seminars on special topics. We particularly encourage applications from students whose interests coincide with the research areas of the faculty, and we welcome visits from interested students.

Located in Cocke Hall on the Lawn of Thomas Jefferson's "Academical Village," the Department houses the Constantine Library, a reading room for graduate students and advanced undergraduates.  Graduate students, members of the Classics faculty, and others with related interests meet informally once a week at lunch for the reading of papers and dicussion of work in progress.  There are numerous guest lectures throughout the year, including the annual Arthur F. Stocker and James S. Constantine Lectures, as well as those sponsored by the Charlottesville chapter of the Archaeological Institute of America.